St. Therese of Lisieux Transitional Mug

$25

Changing color right before your eyes, the St. Therese of Lisieux Transitional Mug will start your day with delight and inspiration. The 15 oz. ceramic mug is solid black until hot water is added, revealing an image on one side and an inspirational saying on the other. When the mug cools, it will return to being solid black. Start your day with prayer and coffee with the saints! Get one for yourself, collect them all or give this "magical" mug as a gift.

 Microwave Safe 
 Hand Wash Only (because not all dishwashers are created equal)

This is a couture item which is custom made-to-order. Our couture collection features exclusive, custom designs with our signature crown somewhere within the design. Not sold in stores and you won’t find this anywhere else!

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Video below featuring St. Mary Magdalene is an example of the color changing effect of the Transitional Mugs.

This custom made-on-demand item ships world-wide directly from our manufacturer in Michigan, USA and should arrive by UPS within 10-15 days within the U.S. or within 2-4 weeks for all other countries. Destination tracking is available on this item for most countries. A tracking number will be emailed to you once your order has shipped.

Please Note that during peak shopping seasons, production and ship time may take a little longer than normal. If you are buying this item as a gift, please order as early as possible. We don't want to disappoint you or the gift recipient with a potentially delayed order.

For countries where tracking numbers are not available, this item should arrive by regular post within 2-4 weeks. Orders that have not arrived within 45 days of order processing are eligible for a free reshipment or a refund.

ST. THERESE OF LISIEUX

1873 - 1897
Feast Days October 3 (Traditional) and October 1 (New)
Patron Saint of Missionaries, France, HIV/AIDS sufferers, florists and gardeners, loss of parents and tuberculosis

 

Marie Francoise-Therese Martin - lovingly called "The Little Flower" - was born in 1873 in Alencon, France to pious parents Louis and Zelie. Both her parents were devout Catholics who would eventually become the first (and to date only) married couple canonized together in 2016. Her mother died when she was four, leaving her father and elder sisters to raise her.

On Christmas Day 1886, Therese had a profound experience of an intimate union with God, which she described as a “complete conversion.” Almost a year later, in a papal audience during a pilgrimage to Rome, she asked for and obtained permission from Pope Leo XIII to enter the Carmelite Monastery at the young age of 15.

On entering, she devoted herself to living a life of holiness, doing all things with love and childlike trust in God. She struggled with life in the convent, but decided to make an effort to be charitable to all, especially those she didn’t like. She performed little acts of charity always, and little sacrifices not caring how unimportant they seemed. These acts helped her come to a deeper understanding of her vocation.

She wrote in her memoir, L'histoire d'une âme (The Story of a Soul), that she had always dreamed of being a missionary, an Apostle, a martyr – yet she was a nun in a quiet cloister in France. How could she fulfill these longings?

Therese offered herself as a sacrificial victim to the merciful Love of God but on the night between Holy Thursday and Good Friday, she noticed the first symptoms of Tuberculosis, the illness which would lead to her death.

Therese recognized in her illness the mysterious visitation of the Divine Spouse and welcomed the suffering as an answer to her offering. She also began to undergo a terrible trial of faith which lasted until her death a year and a half later.

Since her death, millions have been inspired by her "little way" of loving God and neighbor. Many miracles have been attributed to her intercession.

Saint Therese was proclaimed a Doctor of the Church by Pope John Paul II in 1997 - 100 years after her death at the age of 24.

Therese wrote once, "You know well enough that Our Lord does not look so much at the greatness of our actions, nor even at their difficulty, but at the love with which we do them."

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